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Hispanic Heritage Month 2020
Tell us your story.
Hispanic Heritage Month 2020
Tell us your story.

In Honor of Hispanic, Latinx & Chicanx Educators

Each year, we honor the stories of teachers with Spanish, Mexican, Caribbean, Central American and South American heritage who bring vision and leadership to their schools across the U.S. This year we want to hear your stories.

For Hispanic Heritage Month, we want to share the unique stories and insights of Hispanic, Latinx and Chicanx educators like Concepción Camargo and Betsy Blohm.

These educators believe that teaching is a call to action—and prove that their unique backgrounds, experiences and skills can change lives.

Demographics

  • What We're Doing

    For Hispanic Heritage Month, we want to share the unique stories and insights of Hispanic, Latinx and Chicanx educators like Concepción Camargo and Betsy Blohm.

    These educators believe that teaching is a call to action—and prove that their unique backgrounds, experiences and skills can change lives.

    Demographics

  • Why We're Doing It

    In schools, the power of representation, of mirroring students' belief systems and cultural identities, is in abolishing negative stereotypes and generating positive life experiences for Hispanic, Latinx and Chicanx individuals.

    This year, Hispanic Heritage Month is situated in the larger context of calls for racial justice and a global pandemic that has hit Hispanic communities especially hard. Teachers—especially Hispanic, Black, indigenous and immigrant teachers—stand at the intersection of these historic events.

    And this is where we hope our story campaign will shine a light.

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  • Get Paid to Contribute

    Submit a story and our team of editors will work with you to make it shine, publish it and put it out in the world. We will compensate you accordingly (see below) for your story.

    We are especially interested in stories from current and future teachers that reflect the following themes (but if you have another idea, please pitch it to us!)

    • The immigrant experience is deeply American, and teachers, school leaders and school curriculum should all reflect that experience. 
    • Bilingual education and English Language Learner programs support educational equity and justice. 
    • Culturally responsive pedagogy supports educational equity and justice. 

    Stats

     

Not just students—but whole humans

Lucero Denisse Valderrama published her first collection of poems in 2020. Titled Soy Mujer, the poems pulled from all of her experiences, as an immigrant, a woman, a sister, and more. She was surprised and humbled when her 6th grade ELA students begged her to read it to them!

Language has such beauty and power. As a sixth grade English Language Arts teacher, I work to offer the power of words and identity to my students, so they can control their own narratives, write their own translations, and advocate for themselves.

Nurturing Bicultural Americans

For recent immigrants, school is more than a place to learn a new language and culture—it’s a place to forge a community that nurtures the rich and unique identity of each student.

To me, the most important thing is to help students feel safe and respected inside this new country. I want them to understand the U.S. culture, and to also be themselves—not to be afraid or to shed themselves. To keep the riches that they bring.

Mentoring English Language Learners

Concepción Camargo shares what made her first year as a bilingual educator meaningful and rewarding.

"It’s nice to look like my students and come from the same culture and speak the same language...just to let them know, 'I get what you’re going through, but it’s going to be okay.'"

When you're a role model, you might make mistakes, but you can still help your students overcome obstacles.

Make a Difference

A Life-changing Impact

Classes for English language learners offer more than language support—they build confidence, resilience and opportunity.

"Because I found so much support in my ELL teachers, I realized the support a good teacher can have. They made a huge impact on me and other students, and for that reason I decided to become a teacher and help students myself." 

Salvador's Story

Preparing Transformative Teachers

At Naropa University, anti-racism and mindfulness are pillars of the teacher preparation program.

"Through culturally responsive teaching practices, I built authentic relationships with students and families, and I was challenged by facilitating discussions about racism."

Transform Teaching

Playing a Breakout Role

Principal Fabricio Velez shares his unlikely story as an classically-trained dancer from Ecuador who became a champion for English language learner students.

I had no prior training other than my training as an actor. I think that served me well.

Play Your Part

How to Participate

Contact us:  Email info@teach.org and let us know if you would like to:

  • Draft an article or story—500-800 words—and work with our editors to publish it

OR 

  • Submit a short video or 100-word statement.

When we’ll use your story: If we select your story, we will publish it on our web platform and celebrate it on social media during Hispanic Heritage Month (9/15-10/15). If your story is better suited to a different campaign, we’ll let you know when you can expect to hear from us. Either way, we will compensate you for your submission.

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